17th Annual ECSS-Congress, Bruges 2012

Abstract details

Abstract-ID: 395
Session: [IS-PM08] TEAM SPORT & HEALTH *
Lecture room: High Live 1
Date & time: 26.06.2015 / -
Title of the paper: PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS’ EXPERIENCES WITH PARTICIPATION IN FOOTBALL – A QUALITATIVE INVESTIGATION OF THE ‘FC PROSTATE’ RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Authors: Midtgaard, J., Krustrup, P., Uth, J., Brasso, K., Hornstrup, T., Bruun, D.M.
Institution: Rigshospitalet (Copenhagen University Hospital)
Department: Centre for Health Care Research
Country: Denmark
Abstract text INTRODUCTION Evidence is accumulating that exercise-based rehabilitation improves physical capacity and quality of life in cancer survivors. However, recruitment and persistence of male cancer patients in rehabilitation and physical activity are low and novel health promotion strategies are warranted. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to gain an understanding of the meaning of recreational football as a team and interaction oriented health promoting activity in men with prostate cancer (n=26) including perceived acceptability of severe injuries. METHODS A qualitative sub-study of the ‘FC Prostate’ randomized controlled trial was conducted based on 6 focus group interviews (n=6x4-6) and 20 hours of participant observations. Moreover, in-depth individual interviews were performed with four men who had been injured during football training. Data were analysed using framework analysis and descriptive phenomenology, respectively. RESULTS The framework analysis produced 11 sub-themes that were structured into three overarching themes: 1) motivational drivers; 2) united in sport and 3) confirmation of own capacity. The findings indicated that participants regarded football as a welcome opportunity to regain control and acquire a sense of responsibility for own health without assuming the patient role, and football training legitimized and promoted mutual caring behaviour in a male-oriented context. In addition, the phenomenological analysis indicated that injuries acquired through football training, was experienced as ‘perfectly normal’, i.e. a psychologically harmless and meaningful consequence of participating in sport supporting the participants’ feeling of masculinity. DISCUSSION The study suggests that football due to its cultural representation of masculine ideals may be a potent and unique strategy for increasing recruitment and adherence to physical activity in prostate cancer patients. Moreover, the risk of severe injuries related to football training may be outweighed not only by already documented positive physiological effects but equally by the men’s acceptability and perceived psychological benefit of participation in high-risk sporting activities.
Topic: Psychology
Keyword I: Football
Keyword II: Prostate Cancer
Keyword III: Qualitative