17th Annual ECSS-Congress, Bruges 2012

Abstract details

Abstract-ID: 1325
Session: [PO-CPP-04] Coaching & Adapted Physical Activity
Lecture room: Gallery
Date & time: 09.07.2016 / -
Title of the paper: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SPRINT PERFORMANCE AND VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL PERFORMANCE TASKS IN FEMALE FIELD SPORT ATHLETES
Authors: Monahan, M., Petrakos, G., Egan, B.
Institution: University College Dublin
Department: School of Phyisothearpy preformance & population sciences
Country: Ireland
Abstract text Introduction Sprint acceleration is a key determining factor of physical performance in field sports. This study primarily aimed to assess the relationship between 0-10 m (S10) and 0-20 m (S20) sprint acceleration and a range of vertical and horizontal performance tests. Secondly, the study aimed to assess if the strength of relationship between sprint acceleration and performance tests changed when just the fastest 10 participants were analysed. Methods Data was collected from female field sport athletes (n = 21). Vertical performance tests included a countermovement jump (CMJ), CMJ loaded with 50% of body mass (CMJ50), drop jump reactive strength index (DJ RSI) and an isometric mid-thigh clean pull (IMTCP). Horizontal performance tests included a horizontal jump (HJ) and a 5-repeated alternate leg bound (5RB). Results When the full cohort were analysed, S10 held a ‘very large’ relationship with HJ (r = -0.73) and 5RB (r = -0.70), a ‘large’ relationship with CMJ variables (r = -0.61 to -0.64) and a ‘moderate’ to ‘large’ relationship with CMJ50 variables (r = -0.48 to -0.62). When the fastest 10 participants were analysed, the strength of the relationship for both horizontal performance tasks increased (HJ, r = 0.83 and 5RB, r = 0.75), whereas no correlations between vertical performance tasks and S10 reached significance (p > 0.05). When the full cohort were analysed, S20 held a ‘very large’ relationship with HJ (r = -0.79), 5RB (r = -0.75) and CMJ variables (r = -0.71 to -0.75), a ‘moderate’ to ‘large’ relationship with CMJ50 variables (r = -0.44 to -0.63) and a moderate relationship with RSI (r = -0.48). When the fastest 10 participants were analysed, the strength of the relationship increased between S20 and 5RB (r = -0.87) and IMTCP rate of force development variables (r = -0.63 to -0.64). Furthermore, following assessment of just the 10 fastest players, HJ maintained a ‘very large’ relationship with S20 (r = -0.73) but no significant relationships were evident between S20 and CMJ, CMJ50 or DJ variables (p > 0.05). Discussion Horizontal jumping tasks are more predictive of sprint acceleration performance when compared to vertical jump and isometric force tasks. Furthermore, horizontal tasks are more predictive of sprint acceleration ability when just the fastest individuals are accounted for. Future research should investigate sprint acceleration and its longitudinal relationship with horizontal and vertical performance following training.
Topic: Coaching
Keyword I: SPRINT
Keyword II: VERTICAL
Keyword III: HORIZONTAL